Day of Remembrance – Memorial Day

Memorial Day is generally a day to honor those who gave their lives in battle.  I know of one family who received the telegram that their husband fell in battle.  She in turn let his parents and family members know.   Andrew Jackson Kirksey served on the PT 109 with John Kennedy.  Andrew {Jack as he was known, not Andy}  Kirksey was one of two men on board who lost his life.

Many have served in various wars and I am sure all were changed as a result of their experiences.   My father served in the armored division under Gen. Patton.  He saw service in North Africa, England, Belgium, and France.  He served with a sergeant named Virgil Haskell.   Sgt. Haskell did not return home.  There is a newspaper clipping about his service at this link on WikiTree  Haskell.

I wonder how changed my father was after his service in WWII?   He was in Europe for four years.     They had not been married long before he deployed.  I have the many letters he wrote to my mother.  He couldn’t say much in most of the letters but once in awhile he would send photos of what was left of London or a gift from France to his bride who was waiting at home in Washington DC.   She worked at the War Department during this time.

My mother had two brothers who were serving also, Dick Kirksey and Claude Kirksey.  Both returned home safely.  Claude entered the Armed Forces early and served in a chemical battalion in the 1930s.   Dick saw service in the Pacific.

My husband’s father, Robert Wilderman served in the Pacific in the Navy.  He too was gone for a long time.  My husband served in the Navy also during the conflict in Viet Nam.

Further back in time some of my ancestors who I have identified served in the Revolutionary War in some capacity.  Their names are Jacob Ammons, Hugh Barnett, Michael Dickson, and William Filmon,

We honor all those who have served our country in any capacity.

 

#52Ancestors

About agwilderman

Avid genealogist.
This entry was posted in #52Ancestors, genealogy, Military and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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